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JACKSON COUNTY, OREGON
10 S OAKDALE AVE
MEDFORD, OR 97501
June 19, 2021
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COVID-19 News & Information in Jackson County, Oregon

6 May 2021

COVID-19 Updates - May 6, 2021

COVID-19 Updates - May 6, 2021

As of 12:01 am on May 6, 2021, Jackson County Public Health reports 38 new COVID-19 cases. Additionally, two cases with a previous reporting date were removed from the overall total. This brings the total COVID-19 cases in Jackson County to 10,649.

COVID-19 Related Deaths

Jackson County Public Health reports 1 new COVID-19 deaths, bringing the total to 132 since the beginning of the pandemic.

Jackson County’s 132 nd COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old man who tested positive on April 28 and died on May 4 at Providence Medford Medical Center. They had underlying health conditions.

Myths and Facts about COVID-19 Vaccine

Is it safe for me to get a COVID-19 vaccine if I would like to have a baby one day?
Yes. If you are trying to become pregnant now or want to get pregnant in the future, you may get a COVID-19 vaccine when one is available to you.

There is currently no evidence that COVID-19 vaccination causes any problems with pregnancy, including the development of the placenta. In addition, there is no evidence that fertility problems are a side effect of any vaccine, including COVID-19 vaccines.

Will a COVID-19 vaccine alter my DNA?
No. COVID-19 vaccines do not change or interact with your DNA in any way.

There are currently two types of COVID-19 vaccines that have been authorized and recommended for use in the United States: messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines and a viral vector vaccine. Both mRNA and viral vector COVID-19 vaccines deliver instructions (genetic material) to our cells to start building protection against the virus that causes COVID-19. However, the material never enters the nucleus of the cell, which is where our DNA is kept. This means the genetic material in the vaccines cannot affect or interact with our DNA in any way. All COVID19 vaccines work with the body’s natural defenses to safely develop immunity to disease.

Learn more about how mRNA COVID-19 vaccines work.
Learn more about how viral vector vaccines work.

After getting a COVID-19 vaccine, will I test positive for COVID-19 on a viral test?
No. None of the authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines cause you to test positive on viral tests, which are used to see if you have a current infection. Neither can any of the COVID-19 vaccines currently in clinical trials in the United States.

If your body develops an immune response to vaccination, which is the goal, you may test positive on some antibody tests. Antibody tests indicate you had a previous infection and that you may have some level of protection against the virus. Experts are currently looking at how COVID-19 vaccination may affect antibody testing results.

Can a COVID-19 vaccine make me sick with COVID-19?
No. None of the authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines or COVID-19 vaccines currently in development in the United States contain the live virus that causes COVID-19. This means that a COVID-19 vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19.

COVID-19 vaccines teach our immune systems how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19. Sometimes this process can cause symptoms, such as fever. These symptoms are normal and are signs that the body is building protection against the virus that causes COVID-19. Learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work.

It typically takes a few weeks for the body to build immunity (protection against the virus that causes COVID-19) after vaccination. That means it’s possible a person could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 just before or just after vaccination and still get sick. This is because the vaccine has not had enough time to provide protection.

Jackson County Vaccination Equity Center at the Expo:

The Jackson County Equity Vaccination Center at the Expo is available to everyone that needs a COVID-19 vaccine. Everyone 16 years and older is eligible to get vaccinated. The vaccine is free, and people do not need to bring ID or insurance information. The Vaccination Equity Center is a safe place, accessible to all, regardless of legal status. Language interpreters and support for disabilities are available.

Register for an appointment at JacksonCounty.org/GetVaccinated or call 211. Appointments are encouraged, but they are not required

Vaccination Options at the Jackson County Vaccination Equity Center:

  • Walk-through Moderna Site (for individuals 18 years and older)
    • Vaccine: Moderna
    • Operation Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 am to 12:00 pm and 1:00 pm to 6:00 pm
    • No appointment required
  • Drive-Through Pfizer Site (for individuals 16 years and older)
    • Vaccine: Pfizer
    • Operation Hours: Sunday- Saturday
    • Wednesday and Thursday: 7:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
    • All other days: 12:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
    • No appointment required

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