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JACKSON COUNTY, OREGON
10 S OAKDALE AVE
MEDFORD, OR 97501
March 01, 2021
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COVID-19 News & Information in Jackson County, Oregon

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Jackson County Public Health Reports 82 New COVID-19 Cases - DEC 11

Reported COVID-19 cases in Jackson County now 4,704

Jackson County Public Health Reports 82 New COVID-19 Cases - DEC 11

Jackson County Public Health reports 82 new COVID-19 cases as of 12:01 am on December 11, 2020. Additionally, two cases were removed from the total case count that had a previous reporting date. These updates bring the total reported COVID-19 cases in Jackson County to 4,704. Jackson County reports three new COVID-19 death; this update brings the total COVID-19 deaths to 48.

Jackson County’s 46th COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old male who tested positive on November 17 and died on December 3 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Jackson County’s 47th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old male who tested positive on November 21 and died on November 29 at Rogue Regional Medical Center. The patient had underlying conditions.

Jackson County’s 48th COVID-19 death is a 55-year-old female who became symptomatic on December 3 after contact with a confirmed case and died on December 6 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.
 

For additional information, visit the Jackson County COVID-19 Data Dashboard at Situation in Jackson County, Oregon webpage. The  Oregon Health Authority’s COVID-19 Data Dashboard website does publish Jackson County COVID-19 data.

How to Prevent the Spread of COVID-19

Jackson County Public Health understands that most people are burnt out from hearing about COVID-19 and using the strategies to prevent the spread of COVID-19.  But, it remains essential to continue to use multiple non-pharmaceutical strategies to prevent the spread of COVID-19. “We understand that communities are exhausted from dealing with this, but we cannot let our guards down yet,” states Dr. Jim Shames, Jackson County Health Officer. According to the Centers for Disease Control, no single strategy can control the pandemic; instead, a multipronged approach using all available evidence-based strategies at the individual and community levels can break transmission chains and address high levels of community transmission; reduce related illnesses, long-term sequelae, and deaths; and mitigate the pandemic’s economic impact.1​

Multiple Layers Improve Success

Jackson County is under the Extreme Risk level, and disease activity is widespread in the county. Please follow the guidance under the Extreme Risk; following the guidance will help reduce community spread of COVID-19. Information can be found on the OHA website.

To prevent the spread of COVID-19

  • Cover your mouth and nose with a mask
  • Avoid close contact and keep 6 feet of distance between yourself and people who do not live in your household. The fewer people you are around, the better.
  • Wash your hands often
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces that are touched frequently with common EPA registered household disinfectants
  • Monitor your health, be alert for symptoms
  • Always cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow, and do not spit
  • Jackson County is under the Extreme Risk level, and disease activity is widespread in the county. Please follow the guidance under the Extreme Risk; following the guidance will help reduce community spread of COVID-19. Information can be found on the OHA website.

Updates on Quarantine Guidance

Yesterday, the Oregon Health Authority announced that the new state guidance for quarantine follows the Centers for Disease Control guidance. Both the Centers for Disease Control and the Oregon Health Authority state that the local health authorities make the final decisions about how long quarantine should last. Jackson County Public Health is in the process of adopting the new guidance and will begin implementation on Monday, December 14, 2020.

Options to Reduce Quarantine (Jackson County will Implement the new Guidance on Monday, December 14, 2020)

A person who has been exposed to the virus will need to quarantine if they have spent more than 15 minutes over a 24-hour period in close proximity (less than 6 feet away) with an infected individual. Quarantine means keeping someone who might have been exposed to COVID-19 away from others. 

If a person has been near someone with COVID-19, they should stay home and at least 6 feet away from everyone, including the people they live with, for 14 days.

A 14-day quarantine is the safest option to prevent the spread of COVID-19 to others and the preferred quarantine period by Jackson County Public Health.  Though, if you have not developed any symptoms, you may consider ending quarantine early. 

  • After 10 days, without any testing, or
  • After day 7, after receiving a negative test result (test must occur on day 5 or later)

There is a small but significant chance that you may develop symptoms after 7 days. Therefore you will need to continue to:

  • Watch for symptoms until the 14-day preferred quarantine period has ended
  • Continue to wear a mask, stay at least 6 feet from others, wash your hands, avoid large crowds

For more information:

References.

  1. Honein MA, Christie A, Rose DA, et al. Summary of Guidance for Public Health Strategies to Address High Levels of Community Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 and Related Deaths, December 2020. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. ePub: 4 December 2020. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6949e2

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